Torus Or Buckle Fracture Definition

Torus Or Buckle Fracture Definition

A buckle fracture, also called a torus fracture, is an extremely common injury seen in children. Because children have softer, more flexible bones, one side of the bone may buckle upon itself without disrupting the other side of the bone—also known as an incomplete fracture.
Torus fractures, also known as buckle fractures, are incomplete fractures of the shaft of a long bone that is characterised by bulging of the cortex. They result from trabecular compression from an axial loading force along the long axis of the bone.
X-ray example of a torus or buckle fracture (red arrows) of the wrist (Lateral). Treatment. The vast majority of forearm fractures can be treated without surgery.
If the x-ray shows a distal radius buckle (torus) fracture, then your child will get. If these symptoms continue after 2 weeks, please call the Orthopedic Center at .
Most forearm fractures are buckle fractures, also known as torus fractures. The traditional treatment for a buckle fracture is to cast the injury for a short duration, .
Torus fractures normally heal on their own within a month, with rest and disuse. Also known as incomplete fracture or buckle fracture. CONTINUE SCROLLING .

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